03:59 GMT27 September 2020
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    An advertisement for a Peloton exercise bike went viral this month after netizens attacking the ad insisted that it was “sexist”. Many comedians and commentators made memes about the commercial which featured a woman diligently using a stationary exercise device her husband bought her as a Christmas gift.

    The actor in the controversial Peloton exercise bike commercial, Sean Hunter, played the character of the husband. On Saturday, he noted that he was spotted at a Peloton store in Los Angeles, and hat he had been receiving “hurtful” and “negative” messages on social media following the ad's backlash.

    “A few bad ones, a few negative ones”, Hunter revealed. “Some I delete right away. Some are personal attacks, some make fun of my image, some say you’re a bad person for doing it”, he said.

    Hunter, who appeared in the commercial as the husband giving the wife a Peloton stationary exercise bike as a Christmas gift, is a Canadian elementary school teacher. Hunter disagreed with allegations that the ad was “sexist”, after a recent Saturday Night Live (SNL) episode mocked the commercial.

    “It was frustrating, actually, I’ll be honest. They said the new Peloton ad is labelled as sexist and it was there in bold. I disagree. They’re reinforcing that that’s what people are thinking about it and I don’t feel that way. That’s not the truth about the commercial at all", Hunter said in the video. “I love SNL but when they make jokes of things, they should see the Instagram DM’s I have, it’s hurtful".

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    commercial, Peloton, ad, Viral
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