10:01 GMT +314 November 2019
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    Twitter Erupts Over Predictably Unpronounceable German Word for 'Withdrawal Bill'

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    A notoriously lengthy German word is Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitan, a staggering 42 letters, which translates to ‘Danube steamship company captain’ in English. However, it's technically not even the longest.

    Germany is renowned for its unimaginably protracted and borderline unpronounceable words – writer Mark Twain once said some German words were so long, they have a perspective – so it’s doubly fitting the country’s term for ‘Withdrawal Agreement Bill’ is ‘Austrittsvertragsratifizierungsgesetz’.

    The 37-letter-long tongue twister has caught the attention of a many a Twitter user, with many pointing out the irony of something seemingly so implausible to achieve it almost impossible to articulate.

    ​Perhaps the British public will finally have learned how to say Austrittsvertragsratifizierungsgesetz by the time the UK actually leaves the European Union – when, or perhaps if, that finally comes to pass.

    ​Other staggeringly vast entries in the German lexicon include 63-letter monstrosity Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz, an amalgamated word meaning ‘beef labeling regulation and delegation of supervision law’, which was a German Word of the Year in 1999.

    ​Another bloater is the number 7,254, as the German for it is siebentausendzweihundertvierundfUnfzig.

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    EU Withdrawal Bill, withdrawal, German, Germany
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