00:51 GMT +319 July 2019
Listen Live
    UK Prime Minister Theresa May

    UK Needs Strong Leader, Who's Rule-Breaker - Brits in New Survey

    © AP Photo / Frank Augstein
    Viral
    Get short URL
    150

    Two-thirds of the UK public have said they'd prefer if politicians spoke their minds, regardless of what everyone else thinks, while more than half consider Britain to be in decline, as reported in a new study.

    A shift in the public perception of UK political parties, the role of parliamentarians and the government’s style of governance and approach to divisive matters has been recorded by the Hansard Society, a UK charity specialising in research and advice on Parliament.

    Asked whether they prefer politicians to stick to their positions or make compromises with people they disagree with, the percentage of respondents supporting each option was split 45 per cent and 48 per cent, respectively.

    "Preferring a strong leader who is willing to break the rules, or thinking that the government should be able to tackle the country's problems without worrying about the approval of parliament, would challenge core tenets of our democracy. The public feel strongly that the system of governing favours the rich and powerful and that political parties don't care about the average person. And people are not confident that politicians act in the public interest. Unless something changes, this is a potentially toxic recipe for the future of British politics," Hansard Society director Ruth Fox suggested.

    75 per cent of surveyed Britons claimed that the main political parties are so divided in themselves that they cannot serve the best interests of the country.

    The two largest UK parties — the Conservatives and Labour — have been rocked by bitter infighting over the course of Brexit negotiations, leading up to several MPs defecting to form the Change UK Party.

    READ MORE: Independent Group Rebrands Itself as 'Change UK', Registers for EU Elections

    The inability of the government and MPs to figure Brexit out may have pushed the public to have more confidence in the military and judges, especially as some believe MPs come across as unprepared and ill-versed in its legalities and economic impact

    A number of politicians in charge of the country, such as PM Theresa May, former Cabinet minister Boris Johnson, former UKIP leader Nigel Farage and Brexit ministers, as well as Parliament backbenchers, have been exposed for their misleading or false Brexit promises and claims.

    A combination of picture created in London on November 25, 2018 shows Conservative MPs (L) opposed to the Brexit withdrawl deal negotiated with EU by prime minister Theresa May (R), (top L-R) Jacob Rees-Mogg, chair of the Euro-sceptic European Research Group (ERG), and former prominent cabinet ministers David Davis and Boris Johnson who support the ERG's opposition to the deal and remain-supporting Conservative MPs (bottom L-R) Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve and Jo Johnson all pictured in London.
    © AFP 2019 / Ben Stansall
    A combination of picture created in London on November 25, 2018 shows Conservative MPs (L) opposed to the Brexit withdrawl deal negotiated with EU by prime minister Theresa May (R), (top L-R) Jacob Rees-Mogg, chair of the Euro-sceptic European Research Group (ERG), and former prominent cabinet ministers David Davis and Boris Johnson who support the ERG's opposition to the deal and remain-supporting Conservative MPs (bottom L-R) Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve and Jo Johnson all pictured in London.

    READ MORE: "Brexit-Shamed" UK Politicians Exposed for 'Forgotten Lies' in Giant Displays

    "Civil servants, television broadcasters and trade unions command greater public confidence than do politicians," the report said.

    With only 25 per cent confident in Westminster's ability to handle Brexit, the majority (72 per cent) said the UK system of governance needs ‘quite a lot' or  ‘a great deal' of improvement. 

    At the same time, more people — compared to last year's figures — said they are not at all interested in politics and know nothing about it.

    Theresa May has on Sunday attempted to explain "what on earth is happening with Brexit". In a short video address, the PM gave an update on the progress of Brexit talks. However, the outcome remains largely unclear as main parties and the EU leadership still haven't reached a decision on an exit agreement.

    The risk of a new general election is a possibility in the coming months, pending on May's success in closing a Brexit deal.

    According to Hansard Society report, 61 per cent of respondents indicated they would be certain to vote in an immediate general election.

    Related:

    "Brexit-Shamed" UK Politicians Exposed for 'Forgotten Lies' in Giant Displays
    Hysteria & Blazing Fires: How SM Reacted to May's 'Let Me Explain Brexit' Clip
    Independent Group Rebrands Itself as 'Change UK', Registers for EU Elections
    Tags:
    leadership, survey, Brexit, United Kingdom
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik