23:01 GMT +313 November 2018
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    Irish singer-songwriter Sinead O'Connor performs during a concert at the Koninklijk Circus - Cirque Royal, in Brussels on April 12, 2012.

    Twitter Explodes as Irish Singer Sinead O'Connor Reportedly Converts to Islam

    © AFP 2018 / CHRISTOPHE KETELS / BELGA / AFP
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    The Grammy award-winning singer once revealed that she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and had struggled with depression, and PTS for many years.

    Sinead O'Connor, who changed her name to Magda Davitt last year, has reportedly converted to Islam, having now taken a new name, Shuhada, which means “martyr” in Arabic.

    READ MORE: 'Only the Start': Norway Gets Its First Hijab-Wearing Model

    The announcement was made on an unverified Twitter account, where she also posted a picture of herself in a hijab.

    She also retweeted a video by Imam Shaykh Dr. Umar al-Qadri of her saying the Islamic declaration of faith:

    O'Connor also changed her Twitter profile image to a Nike symbol with the caption “wear a hijab. Just do it.”

    READ MORE: Muslim Student Aims to Become First Miss England Beauty to Wear Hijab in Finals

    While she’s been inundated with welcome messages from Muslims, other social media users have suggested that O’Connor was only looking for attention:

    Some hinted at her previous revelations about her mental health issues, saying that she was unstable:

    O'Connor, who previously opened up about how she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder over ten years ago and had struggled with suicidal thoughts, has had a complicated relationship with religion.

    Back in the early 1990s, she tore up a picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live to protest child abuse in the Catholic Church.

    A few years later, Bishop Michael Cox of an independent Catholic group, the Irish Orthodox Catholic and Apostolic Church, ordained the singer as a priest.

    In 2011, she penned an article for the Sunday Independent, in which she called the Vatican “a nest of devils,” and called for the establishment of an “alternative church.”

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    conversion, mental illness, bipolar disorder, singer, islam
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