07:45 GMT +317 July 2019
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    Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives at the Hotel San Domenico for a working session with outreach countries and international organizations, on the second day of the G7 summit of Heads of State and of Government, on May 27, 2017 in Taormina, Sicily

    Twitter on Fire as Canadian PM Fined for Not Declaring Gift of Sunglasses

    © AFP 2019 / Evan Vucci
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    Under Canadian law, the prime minister must report any gifts the value of which exceeds $200 within 30 days.

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's failure to declare two pairs of leather-covered Fellow Earthlings-brand sunglasses presented to him by Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan last summer wound up costing him $100 Canadian (about $75 US). 

    The eyewear, worth between $300 and $500, was not declared "as a result of an administrative error," prompting the fine, according to Trudeau's press secretary.

    The sunglasses slip-up was the second time two years that Trudeau has gotten in trouble with Canada's parliamentary ethics watchdog following two vacations at a private island owned by the Aga Khan in 2016, which officials warned may have been an effort to curry political influence.

    Social media users, still recovering from Trudeau's alleged 'fake eyebrow' at the G7 summit earlier this month, took to Twitter to discuss the new slipup.

    As expected, some simply made light of the incident.

    Others, however, said that this "seemingly trivial" fine was how things should be when it comes to government accountability.

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    reaction, fine, gift, ethics, sunglasses, Justin Trudeau, Canada
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