09:07 GMT19 April 2021
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    Previously, use of the vaccine made by the British-Swedish pharmaceutical giant was suspended in many countries across the world after several people inoculated with the drug died of blood clots in their brains.

    The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) announced that the Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) has "expressed concern that AstraZeneca may have included outdated information from that trial, which may have provided an incomplete view of the efficacy data".

    "We urge the company to work with the DSMB to review the efficacy data and ensure the most accurate, up-to-date efficacy data be made public as quickly as possible", an official release said.
    Vials labelled with broken sticker AstraZeneca COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine and a broken syringe are seen in front of a displayed AstraZeneca logo in this illustration taken March 15, 2021.
    © REUTERS / DADO RUVIC
    Vials labelled with broken sticker "AstraZeneca COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine" and a broken syringe are seen in front of a displayed AstraZeneca logo in this illustration taken March 15, 2021.

    Despite the ongoing probes into the fatal blood clot cases, the WHO and the European Medicines Agency stated they recommend to use the vaccine, noting that the benefits of the drug outweigh its risks.

    At the same time, according to the British Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the evidence does not suggest that blood clots in veins (venous thromboembolism) are caused by the vaccine.

    Tags:
    COVID-19, coronavirus, vaccine, Vaccine, vaccine, vaccine, AstraZeneca
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