14:08 GMT12 April 2021
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    In his televised speech on Friday, Biden condemned the attack in Atlanta that took the lives of eight people, including six Asian women. While police have not officially confirmed that it was a hate crime, Biden and others have pointed out that the incident occurred in the wake of an increase in anti-Asian sentiments over the last year.

    Amara Walker, a CNN reporter, fought back tears as she reported live from Atlanta after President Biden delivered a speech condemning the rise in violence against Asian-Americans over the past year.

    Following Biden's speech, in which he also urged his fellow citizens to unite against bigotry and racism in the United States, Walker, who is Korean-American, said she "cannot overstate how much it means for the Asian-American community" for Biden and Vice President Harris to visit Atlanta and meet with local leaders in the aftermath of Tuesday's massage parlor massacre.

    “For the president to come and say, ‘I see you, I hear you, I feel your pain,'" she said before pausing for a little bit, "and to elevate this issue, I think a lot of us — it’s a cathartic moment, because the first step is to be seen and to be heard."

    "And the fact that we have the vice president also acknowledging the history of racism against Asians that we have faced since the day that the Chinese immigrants started immigrating to the United States,” Walker added, referring to Harris’s own remarks made prior to Biden's.

    “When you are a foreigner in your own country, you are dehumanized, you are not taken seriously,” the CNN correspondent said, echoing Harris's comment that Asian-Americans feel like they don't belong in the United States.
    City of Atlanta police officers are seen outside of Gold Spa after deadly shootings at a massage parlor and two day spas in the Atlanta area, in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. March 16, 2021. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
    © REUTERS / CHRISTOPHER ALUKA BERRY
    City of Atlanta police officers are seen outside of Gold Spa after deadly shootings at a massage parlor and two day spas in the Atlanta area, in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. March 16, 2021. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry

    Walker also addressed the police officer of Cherokee County's comment, adding that the characterization of the shooter made by him elicited a "visceral" reaction from many Asian-Americans across the nation.

    "If there is a crime committed against you or your community, even law enforcement might dismiss it as the perpetrator was just having a bad day,” she said, referring to the controversial comments. "That’s because for so long, Asian-Americans have felt like they have not been taken seriously, they have not been seen."

    She went on to say that she and her family have been called the "China virus," a term used by former President Trump to describe COVID-19, and that they have been told to "go back to your country."

    The 21-year-old suspect in the shootings, Georgia-native Robert Aaron Long, was denied bail and charged with eight counts of murder. The gunman himself, during interrogation, stated that he suffers from a sex addiction. He denies that the attack was motivated by racial hatred. According to authorities, he also planned to travel to Florida to attack "some type of porn industry."

    Related:

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    Video: NYC Mayor de Blasio Chased Out of 'Stop Asian Hate' Vigil, Called 'Racist'
    China Slams Violence Against US Asians as 'Outrageous, Distressing' After Massage Parlour Massacre
    Georgia Officer in Hot Water After Saying Atlanta Spa Shooter Had 'Really Bad Day'
    Biden Orders US Flags Flown at Half-Staff to Honour Victims of Atlanta Spa Shooting
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    president, Atlanta, CNN, Hate Crimes, Asians, Joe Biden, Biden, USA, US
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