00:32 GMT07 March 2021
Listen Live
    US
    Get short URL
    by
    6516
    Subscribe

    Earlier this week, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee defended its decision to hire Dyjuan Tatro, touting the 34-year-old former gang member as a current "national leader in the bipartisan movement to reform" the US criminal justice system.

    The gang "triggerman"-turned-Congressional Democratic adviser has scrapped his tweets lambasting President Joe Biden and VP Kamala Harris, The Washington Post (WaPo) reports.

    According to the newspaper, 34-year-old Dyjuan Tatro from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) lashed out at the very Democrats he is now working with in a series of now-deleted-tweets that were posted between 2019 and 2020. The DCCC and the White House have not commented on the matter yet.

    "I would like people like you to sit down & think about the harm Joe Biden & men like him have caused, orchestrated, and perpetuated in communities of colour. Joe Biden has hurt my community. I don't want Trump or Joe Biden to win", Tatro reportedly tweeted in May 2020.

    At the time, Senator Bernie Sanders had withdrawn from the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, and Biden became the party's presidential hopeful

    In April 2019, one day after Biden entered the presidential race, Tatro described the former US vice president as "an architect of mass incarceration".

    "What he helped build has ruined the lives of millions of Americans. Please don't overlook this aspect of his character", the newest DCCC employee tweeted back then, arguing in another tweet that "Biden's version of police reform: 'shoot 'em in the leg'".

    The ex-gang member also did not mince words when giving his thoughts about then-Senate Judiciary Committee member Kamala Harris in a July 2019 tweet.

    Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks to members of the media at her alma mater, Howard University, Monday, Jan. 21, 2019 in Washington, following her announcement earlier in the morning that she will run for president
    © AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta
    Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks to members of the media at her alma mater, Howard University, Monday, Jan. 21, 2019 in Washington, following her announcement earlier in the morning that she will run for president

    "I'm really tired of Black men saying Kamala Harris was only doing her job as a prosecutor while she waged war on black and brown bodies because that's the same line police use when they murder unarmed Black men. This is a really sh—y dichotomy", Tatro asserted.

    The WaPo report comes a week after the DCCC tapped the former gangster as the committee's senior adviser for diversity and inclusion. A DCCC spokesman defended the move in an interview with the New York Post, describing Tatro as "a formerly incarcerated person who has worked hard to change the trajectory of his life through education and service to his community".

    "He has served his time for the crimes he committed and is now a national leader in the bipartisan movement to reform our criminal justice system and bring meaningful improvements to the education system in American prisons", the spokesman added.

    Tatro, in turn, said that he was "honoured" to join the DCCC to work on a raft of issues "at the nexus of politics, diversity, and equity & inclusion".

    The 34-year-old was released from federal prison in October 2017 but remains on parole in New York for drug and assault convictions, according to a database by the state's Department of Corrections and Community Supervision.

    In December 2010, Tatro admitted to attempted murder, assault, running guns for fellow Original Gangsta Killas gang members from out-of-state sources, as well as distributing crack cocaine.

    Related:

    'Is She Really in Charge Now?': Netizens Puzzled as VP Harris Takes Foreign Calls on Behalf of Biden
    Biden-Harris Inauguration Day: Swearing-in Ceremony for US President and Vice President
    Broken Traditions: How Biden-Harris Inauguration Compared to Past US Ceremonies
    Community standardsDiscussion