09:58 GMT21 January 2021
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    Amid the ongoing contested results of the US election, rumors and calls for US President Donald Trump to run in the 2024 presidential cycle have run rampant, with a slew of former administration and campaign officials highlighting the president’s chances should the 2020 election be officially called for Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

    A new survey conducted by Seven Letter Insight has revealed that 66% of surveyed Republican voters want Trump to run for reelection in the 2024 presidential election, while another 38% of GOP-aligned individuals want the president to “refuse to give up power and remain in the White House.”

    When asked whether Trump should “contest the election in the [US] Supreme Court,” 63% of Republican voters agreed with the statement, as did 40% of surveyed independents and 28% of Democrats.

    Since the US media overwhelmingly called the election for Biden on November 7, Trump has repeatedly raised allegations of voter fraud with claims that deceased Americans had voted, and that votes in his favor were miscounted.

    Although the Trump reelection campaign has filed several lawsuits contesting results in battleground states, many of the challenges have been rejected. Most recently a federal judge in Pennsylvania dismissed a lawsuit that sought to block the Keystone State’s certification of ballots.

    The survey also found that another 67% of Republicans indicated they would support Trump peacefully handing over the presidential reins to the incoming Biden administration, whereas 52% approved of the idea of Trump endorsing one of his children to run in the 2024 cycle.

    In fact, Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., prompted a stir on social media ahead of the November 3 vote after sharing an image of him standing next to a banner that read “Don Jr. 2024.” The banner itself was posted at the Nevada Livestock Auction.

    Among other questions in the survey, 77% of Republicans indicated they wanted Trump to “help guide the Republican Party,” and another 63% of them wanted Trump to “stop using Twitter to discuss politics.” 

    Overall, 82% of those surveyed indicated they wanted Trump to “call for national unity.” 

    More than 50% of respondents also wanted Trump to “leave American politics and recede into private life” and “leave the country as he has stated he’d do on the campaign trail.”

    Earlier this month, reports suggested that Trump was growing increasingly tired and frustrated with the Fox News network, especially after the conservative outlet called Arizona for Biden when vote counting was in its earlier stages. As such, sources later revealed to Axios that Trump was considering launching his own digital platform to go toe-to-toe with the Fox News machine.

    When asked what Trump should do next, only 38% of the entire survey sample welcomed the idea of the president launching his own network.

    The poll, which is the first nationwide survey by the group, included responses from 1,500 individuals who were polled from November 10 through November 19. According to Seven Letter Insight, the majority of the respondents identified as white, came from suburban communities and were between the ages of 45 and 64.

    The breakdown in political party affiliations came down with 37% of respondents saying they identified as Republican, while 26% were independents, and 37% were Democrats. Fifty-one percent of those surveyed said they voted for Biden.

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    Tags:
    voters, Republican, survey, Poll, US Election, Joe Biden, 2024 US Presidential Elections, Donald Trump
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