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    Hundreds of Rare Crocodiles Thrive Near South Florida Nuclear Plant

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    Man-made canals surrounding Turkey Point nuclear plant in South Florida have become home to hundreds of once-endangered American crocodiles. Last week, 73 crocodile hatchlings were rescued by a group of biologists to be measured, tagged with microchips and released into the wild again.

    American crocodiles which used to be on the brink of extinction have turned out to be thriving in an unusual location - the 270-kilometres-long canals surrounding Turkey Point nuclear generating station in South Florida, the Associated Press has reported.

    A team of biologists has been working to catch baby crocodiles and relocate them into the canals to provide them with more favourable conditions for nesting since rising sea levels had been wasting the reptiles' nests along the coasts.

    The experts measure little crocodiles, tag them with microchips and release them to observe their development and - later - relocate them to boost survival rates. 

    Michael Lloret, a wildlife biologist and crocodile specialist, says that American crocodiles have a better chance of survival at Turkey Point as it is away from humans who have traditionally hunted the species in large numbers, although cases of attacks on humans are very rare. 

    "American crocodiles have a bad reputation when they are just trying to survive. They are shy and want nothing to do with us...", Lloret said.

    An American alligator eats a fish in a canal at Everglades Holiday Park in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on April 27, 2019.
    © AFP 2019 / RHONA WISE
    An American alligator eats a fish in a canal at Everglades Holiday Park in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on April 27, 2019.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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