16:39 GMT +320 November 2017
Live
    Carter Page, an adviser to U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, speaks at the graduation ceremony for the New Economic School in Moscow, Russia. (File)

    Russia Gate Saga Continues: Trump Adviser Page's Latest Revelations

    © AP Photo/ Pavel Golovkin
    US
    Get short URL
    31072114

    The scrutiny into Carter Page's alleged ties to Russia has reportedly revealed that in July 2016 the adviser receieved insights from his meetings with Russian lawmakers and also met a senior Russian official who expressed support for Trump. Carter, however, has denied the allegations, testifying before the House Intelligence Committee.

    Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump’s campaign sent an email to other Trump aides describing "a private conversation" he had with a senior Russian official during his trip to Moscow in July 2016, The Washington Post reported.

    Page, whose sworn testimony was released Monday, has come under scrutiny as part of the investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential campaign.

    According to the newspaper, the email contradicts earlier statements by Page who had said that during his visit he had only a brief exchange of greeting with Russian Deputy Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich.

    In his note, Page told J.D. Gordon, a Trump campaign official, that he received some "incredible insights" from his meetings with Russian lawmakers and members of the Russian presidential administration.

    He also wrote that Dvorkovich had "expressed strong support for Trump and a desire to work together toward devising better solutions in response to a vast range of current international problems."

    Testifying before the committee, Page, however, denied that he met any Russian officials, saying that he learned of their views about the US election from local media and scholars. He also insisted that he did not discuss the matter with Dvorkovich.

    READ MORE: Mueller Investigation Has Enough Evidence to Charge Michael Flynn – Media Report

    Ex-Trump Campaign Adviser Carter Page Says Never Met With Lavrov, Rogozin, Patrushev

    Former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page said in a testimony to Congress that he has not interacted with top Russian government officials, including Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, during the 2016 US presidential race.

    When asked whether he has met with Lavrov, Carter responded, "No."

    Page also denied having interactions with the Secretary of Russia's Security Council Nikolai Patrushev and Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin.

    Page stated in the testimony he saw Mikhail Fridman, a founder of the multinational conglomerate Alfa Group, during a 2008 trip to Moscow, but only said "hello to him briefly."

    The former Trump adviser testified he had the same exchange with Friedman’s business partner Peter Aven.

    Page also told the US House intelligence committee that he never met Russian attorney Natalia Veselnitskaya and does not know US-based businessman Ike Kaveladze, both of whom participated in a meeting with Donald Trump Jr. in June 2016.

    Page’s visit to Moscow drew attention during the campaign. In September 2016, he said he was taking a leave of absence due to the investigation.

    The investigation led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller is being carried out on behalf of the US Department of Justice and has already indicted three members of Trump's campaign team. They are former campaign manager Paul Manafort, and former campaign aides Rick Gates and George Papadopoulos.

    Page Says Never Communicated With DNC Hackers, WikiLeaks

    Former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page said in a testimony to Congress that he has never communicated with WikiLeaks, its founder Julian Assange or persons or entities responsible for hacking the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in the summer of 2016.

    Asked whether he has had any communication with hacker Guccifer 2.0, DNC leaks or entities that claimed responsibility for hacking DNC and then leaking documents to the media, Page said "No."

    READ MORE: Hacking Shadowplay: 'Guccifer' Claims 'Guccifer 2.0' is US Government Entity

    Page provided the same answer in his testimony to the question whether he has ever communicated with WikiLeaks or Assange.

    Commenting on his role in the campaign, Page has stated that he has never spoken or had any direct communication with Donald Trump when he was a presidential candidate or upon becoming president of the United States.

    Asked whether he has ever spoken, interacted on social media or received a message or an email from Trump, Page stated "No," clarifying his statement saying that he has never directly communicated with Trump by any means.

    According to Page, he was a "low-level junior guy" in the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential race.

    During the summer of 2016, thousands of DNC emails and other data, including the personal emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair John Podesta, were made public by WikiLeaks.

    US intelligence agencies have accused Russia of having a role in the DNC breach, but have not provided any proof or information on how they reached that conclusion.

    The Russian government has repeatedly denied meddling in the 2016 US presidential election, saying the US allegations are absurd and intended to deflect public attention from actual instances of election fraud and corruption as well as other domestic issues.

    Page testified before the US Senate Intelligence Committee on November 2, but the testimony was released on Monday night.

    Related:

    Flynn Investigation Part of ‘Great Sleight of Hand’ That is Russia Gate
    Mueller Probing Whether Flynn Helped Seek Clinton Emails from Russian Hackers
    Trump Calls for Faster Release of Clinton Emails, Uranium Deal Investigation
    First Charges Filed in Mueller Investigation on Trump Russia Collusion - Report
    Tags:
    "Russian meddling", investigation, Carter Page, Donald Trump, United States, Russia
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik
    • Сomment