19:58 GMT17 January 2021
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    On Monday, US media reported that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is thinking about leaving his post before the year-end, but on Tuesday the State Department spokesperson said that Tillerson will stay on. However, there is no smoke without fire. RIA contributor Vladimir Ardayev looked into the matter.

    “Unprofessional”

    The list of differences the former ExxonMobil CEO has had with the White House includes the decision to backtrack on the Obama Administration’s policy of “strategic patience” with Iran, and Trump’s erratic way of appointing senior officials, including US ambassadors. 

    Tillerson is also said to be troubled by last week's shakeup of Trump's legal team, the resignations of the presidential press secretary Sean Spicer and the President’s angry rebuke of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

    In a recent interview with The New York Times, Trump sharply criticized his attorney general and longtime supporter saying it was "unfair to the President" that Sessions recused himself from any decisions related to the investigation of Russia’s alleged meddling in the US presidential election. Trump added that he wished he had not appointed Sessions to the post.

    Rex Tillerosn reportedly described the president’s public rebuke of Sessions as “unprofessional.”

    National Security Adviser Michael Flynn was the first Trump appointee to leave the Administration in February, less than a month after taking the job.

    It looks like personnel reshuffles are becoming a signature style of the 45th President of the United States, Vladimir Ardayev wrote, adding that with the possible exits of Tillerson and Sessions the Trump team could never be the same again.

    Honesty or Treachery?

    A onetime Alabama Attorney General and arguably one of the biggest Trump loyalists in the US Senate, Jeff Sessions advised the would-be president on immigration and national security issues and was widely seen as the country’s next Defense Secretary.

    However, Sessions fell out of favor with the president when he recused himself in March from investigations related to the 2016 presidential campaign, including probes of alleged Russian interference in the US election.

    In an interview with the New York Times, Donald Trump said that he would not have appointed Sessions to the position if he knew Sessions would recuse himself.

    Stylistic Differences

    White House press secretary Sean Spicer stepped down last Friday over disagreement with President Trump’s appointment of New York financier Anthony Scaramucci as his new communications director.

    Spicer said appointing Scaramucci was “a major mistake.”

    And still, Spicer’s resignation and the possible exits of Rex Tillerson and Jeff Sessions still look more like the result of stylistic, rather than political, differences within the Trump Administration whose members are apparently not happy about the way the president manages his government, Vladimir Ardayev wrote.

    Trump’s tough and provocative way of running the people around him more befits a business executive, than a national leader, who should have different priorities and a different idea of his own career as a politician.

    Meanwhile, the departure of such key Administration figures as Rex Tillerson and Jeff Sessions could usher in a serious change of course, both in domestic and foreign policy.

    Someone with a “pro-Russian background” like Tillerson will hardly become the next Secretary of State, and the new Attorney General will most likely take a much closer look at the Trump team’s alleged ties with Russia, Vladimir Ardayev wrote.

    Related:

    Tillerson to Remain at State Department Despite Reports of Resignation
    Russia Should Brace for New Cold War if Tillerson Replaced With 'Hawk', MP Says
    Tags:
    Iran policy, disagreements, reshuffle, resignations, ExxonMobil, Mike Flynn, Sean Spicer, Anthony Scaramucci, Jeff Sessions, Rex Tillerson, Donald Trump, Barack Obama, US
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