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    Lockheed Martin Wins $100 Million Contract to Boost US Navy Ship Sensors

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    The Pentagon has awarded $100 million contract to US defense and aerospace behemoth Lockheed Martin for boosting Navy ship sensor technology.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Lockheed secured a deal worth some $100 million to upgrade Navy ship sensor technology, the Department of Defense said in a press release.

    The U.S. Navy amphibious assault ships USS Bonhomme Richard, bottom, and USS Boxer, second from top, are underway with the Republic of Korea Navy Dokdo Amphibious Ready Group in the East Sea during exercise Ssang Yong 2016, March 8, 2016
    © REUTERS / U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Darien J. Bjornda
    "Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems [of] Manassas, Virginia is being awarded a $100.4 million… contract for procurement of Technical Insertion-16 Acoustic — Rapid-Commercial-Off-The-Shelf Insertion (A-RCI) systems, spares, and pre-cable kits," the announcement said on Friday.

    The A-RCI Technical Insertion 16 program provides significant improvements in acoustic performance by upgrading ship sensor processing, the Defense Department explained.

    The A-RCI is a sonar system that integrates and improves towed array, hull array, sphere array, and other ship sensor processing through rapid insertion of commercial-off-the-shelf-based hardware and software, the announcement added.

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    ship, sensors, US Navy, United States
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