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    Many Young US Immigrants Fear Trump Will Revoke Their Legal Status

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    Young immigrants who were brought to the United States illegally by their families strongly expect President-elect Donald Trump to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program once he is sworn into office next month.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) – “I’m pretty sure he’s going to take out DACA – I’m positive that’s the first thing he’s going to do,” Jacob Hernandez, 25, a DACA recipient, told Sputnik. “The scholarship that I got when I was in community college I had to use a Social Security number, and that’s the one that DACA helped me to use.”

    Through the program, which legalized status at least temporarily, Hernandez began establishing a credit history and found a good job.

    “It’s thanks to DACA,” he said.

    Trump has promised that once he takes office, he will terminate President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration such as DACA and the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors, known as DREAM. The programs include deportation protections for minor or young-adult immigrants whose families brought them to the United States illegally as children.

    At age 6, Hernandez crossed the border from Mexico with his parents.

    “When I came, it was a change because I didn’t know how to speak English, I didn’t know how to read or write. As an elementary-school student coming from Mexico, it was tough,” he recalled.

    Hernandez overcame the language barrier and, as a result of Obama's actions, will graduate from the University of Texas at El Paso next May with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. He received a full scholarship from a local organization and already has a good-paying job at a lumber company.

    All that Hernandez has worked for, however, could be at risk if the program is eliminated, including his legal status.

    “It’s going to mean I’m going to get fired from my job,” he said. “You lose everything; they take away your Social Security, your ID, everything. You can’t do anything anymore. If I graduate, I’m going to have a bachelor’s degree, but what am I going to do with it? Nothing.”

    If deported, Hernandez would be adrift in a country that is anything but home.

    “I’m from Durango – I don’t know anything from Durango, I don’t remember anything; I was 6 years old. I can hardly remember where I lived, that’s about it,” he said. “There are [DACA] people who don’t know [their native] culture, don’t know the language.”

    Karely Hernandez, 19, also lives in Texas and is a DACA beneficiary. She arrived in the United States from Mexico when she was 3. Her DACA application was approved last August and she has worked to save money for college. (Program recipients don’t qualify for financial aid for education because they aren’t US citizens.)

    Uncertainty over DACA in the Trump administration threatens her future, Hernandez told Sputnik.

    “I think he is going to end the program,” she said. “I have heard many people say he was only going to deport criminals, but I’ve heard many others say that he’s planning on deporting everyone.”

    Scrapping the program could mean “taking away the one thing that has been very important to me, that has opened a lot of doors for me,” Karely Hernandez said. “It won’t only affect me, it will affect my parents; they might send us all back to Mexico.”

    Without DACA, she said, hopes for going to college would be dim.

    “It’s going to be really stressful,” Hernandez said. “Before I got the [DACA] permission, I would baby-sit or I would help my mom clean houses.”

    Democratic congressman Beto O’Rourke said Obama has the power to issue new executive orders to protect young, undocumented US immigrants from deportation once Trump takes office. At a public meeting this week in the Texas city of El Paso, O’Rourke said that before leaving the White House in January, Obama should “offer a pardon to all of those who are covered under DACA right now – a pardon of civil immigration violations.”

    As a precedent, the congressman cited President Jimmy Carter’s 1977 pardon of hundreds of thousands of young American men who had evaded the military draft during the Vietnam War.

    DACA has helped nearly 750,000 undocumented immigrants pursue an education or career in the only country many of them have ever known, O’Rourke said. He added that these beneficiaries contribute as much as $4 trillion in taxable income over their lives in the United States.

    In addition to a pardon, O’Rourke urged Obama to ensure DACA beneficiaries’ information isn’t used against them for deportation purposes.

    Jacob Hernandez told Sputnik that among DACA recipients he knows, one recently finished medical school, another is working toward a master’s degree in English literature and a third is studying structural engineering.

    “I know these people personally, they have the same story as I do,” he said. “If you’re doing things right, you should be considered an American and be given to the chance to get the American dream. That’s what everyone comes here for.”

    Trump’s inauguration as the 45th US president will take place January 20.

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    • ivanwa88
      Don't think Trump wants to penalise those that have made a worthwhile contribution as he said he will focus on the criminals, build the wall, and assess from there obviously he cant make definitive decisions until he's on the inside.

      Its a matter of getting Americans back to work rather than focussing on propping up other nations for purposes of geopolitical ambition at the expense of his own people.
      Its not about recrimination Trump is a business entrepreneur not a fascist police dictator as some want to view him for there own political purposes.

      Its about striking a happy medium creating a sensible balance and stopping the rot in reducing the markers that lead to increases in criminality and anti social behaviour,having hope and a reasonable chance of finding work is so important on so many levels.
    • marcanhalt
      Germany was never Mexico, Central America, the Middle East. They have always been the leaders of innovation, sciences, cultural advancements and technology. For almost half of the USA's history they were captains of industries as well as workers on railroads, in shipyards as well as our armed forces. All of this changed after WWI as they were demonized and still are. All of Mexico does not measure up to Trump's generational families, no matter how they got here.
    • cmat.wolfgang
      From what I know, DT wants to deport illegal migrants who became sentenced criminals.
      He will certainly not stop legal migration like all of those Asian students who come for graduate school. We will see what he will do against illegal trespassing across the Mexican border. But I guess anybody who got a valid Social Security number in a lawful way and is not involved in crimes will probably stay.
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