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    Republican US presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at his Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter, Florida, March 8, 2016.

    Protesters Cast a Shadow on Trump’s First Campaign Visit to a Black Church

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    US Republican candidate Donald Trump, who has been labeled racist soon after he emerged on the political scene with his provocative anti-immigration campaign, visited a black church in Detroit.

    Trump certainly hasn't built his reputation on being nice and politically correct, but analysts have long predicted that when the final stage of the presidential election comes closer, he will start seeking ways to fight for minority votes in a bid to upset Hillary Clinton.

    Proving the observers right, the mogul on Saturday arrived at the Great Faith Ministries International Church, accompanied by fellow Republican Ben Carson, who was born and raised in Detroit.

    He didn't apologize to the audience for any of his earlier blatant remarks that made him extremely unpopular among blacks. But said in a carefully scripted interview with a prominent pastor that he acknowledges the challenges the black community has to overcome daily because of discrimination.

    In his first campaign visit to a black church the real estate giant tried to win the hearts of African Americans by invoking Abraham Lincoln, the civil rights movement, and vowing that he will not ignore the needs of black Americans once he becomes president.

    "I fully understand that the African-American community has suffered from discrimination and that there are many wrongs that must still be made right," Trump said, "For any who are hurting: Things are going to turn around. Tomorrow will be better."

    As for Detroit in particular, Trump promised locals that he will help to "build and rebuild" the city.

    "I am here to listen to you," He told the congregation. "As I prepare to campaign all across the nation, I will have the chance to lay out my economic plans which will be so good for Detroit."

    Yet, many residents didn't believe the GOP candidate was sincere about his pledges. As he spoke, dozens of outraged residents gathered outside the church, holding placards that read "No hate in the White House" and "Mr. Hate, leave my state".

    The protesters believe that Trump has "zero support" among black voters for a reason and that if he wants them to reconsider, visiting a black church once in a while won't be enough.

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    Tags:
    black communities in America, presidential election, Donald Trump, United States
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