02:59 GMT +324 May 2019
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    The US Senate has voted down a proposal that would expand surveillance capabilities of the FBI in the aftermath of the deadly mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) said in a press release on Wednesday.

    US Senate Fails to Pass Amendment Expanding FBI’s Surveillance Capabilities

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    The US Senate has voted down a proposal that would expand surveillance capabilities of the FBI in the aftermath of the deadly mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) said in a press release on Wednesday.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — The amendment was included in the Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, which will see its final vote later in the week, according to the release.

    "The Senate failed to pass an amendment to expand the FBI's National Security Letter powers and to make the ‘lone wolf’ provision of the Patriot Act permanent; however, the amendment will be voted on again later today," the release stated.

    Earlier in the day, the EFF urged the Senate not to expand FBI’s authority.

    "National Security Letters are a dangerous and unconstitutional power as is. This expansion must be rejected," the organization said.

    On June 12, 29-year old US national Omar Mateen attacked the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, killing 49 people and wounding 53 others. Mateen pledged allegiance to the Islamic State terror group, which is outlawed in the United States, Russia and numerous other countries.

    The incident prompted a number of bills to protect the United States from terrorist attacks and adjust existing gun regulations.

    Related:

    FBI Request to Tech Companies Made Public for the First Time
    Orlando Massacre Stems From US War Culture, Invasions - FBI Whistleblower
    Orlando Shooter Claimed Allegiance to Daesh, FBI Says
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    amendments, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), United States
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