02:31 GMT +321 August 2019
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    'Too Much Data': Why US Intelligence Unable to Prevent Terrorism

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    US intelligence agencies can't cope with the vast amount of information they receive, former US National Security Agency employee William Binney said in an interview with RT. He explained that due to their inability to process the huge inflow of personal data the work of intelligence agencies is becoming inefficient.

    Binney explained that intelligence agencies often receive too much information which they are unable to process in time and detect threats in advance. Therefore, they fail to prevent terrorist attacks and often find criminals when it is too late.

    "They have too much data to be able to sort out and detect threats in advance. They have no opportunity to stop them. So the result is: the attacks succeed, people get killed, and then they focus on them with all the data they got on everybody on the planet. Then they can follow them up and go after them. But it is too late," Binney said in an interview with RT.

    Following the scandal with Snowden, the NSA still receives a huge amount of personal data from all over the world. President Obama supported the NSA, despite obvious revelations about the violation of citizens' privacy. In one of his speeches on the subject, he said that security requires the restriction of certain rights, including the right to privacy.

    However, Binney believes such position is used to justify the ongoing surveillance of US authorities over their own citizens and that it would not help secret services in their work.

    "They need to do a professional targeted focus to the job. That is the whole point. By taking in all the data on the planet, on everybody on the planet, they are just buried," he said.

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    data, terrorism, intelligence, United States
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