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    Minneapolis police broke international law in using chemical weapons against protests over the death of African-American Jamar Clark

    Minnesota Police Committed Crime Using Chemicals on Protestors - Activist

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    Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment activist Nabeehah Azeez claim that Minneapolis police broke international law in using chemical weapons against protests over the death of African-American Jamar Clark.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Minneapolis police broke international law in using chemical weapons against protests over the death of African-American Jamar Clark, Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment (MORE) activist Nabeehah Azeez told Sputnik.

    "I feel that using chemical agents against citizens engaging in constitutionally protected activities is a display of excessive police force, is an international crime, and should never be tolerated," Azeez told Sputnik on Friday.

    On Thursday, Minneapolis police said they used chemical irritants to disperse protests over Clark’s death over the weekend. Activists said the 24-year-old was shot in the head while lying handcuffed on the ground and not resisting. The police claimed he was not handcuffed and tried to disarm an officer.

    The United States has seen waves of protests over the past 18 months over a series of incidents when police around the country shot dead a number of unarmed people. US police have killed at least 1,000 Americans in 2015.

    In 1993, 165 countries including the United States signed the Chemical Weapons Convention prohibiting the production and use of chemical weapons and their precursors in any form.

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    Jamar Clark, Minneapolis, United States
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