02:07 GMT26 February 2020
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    The study by the American Civil Liberties Union pointed out that police are required to record the reason for stops but in nearly half of the cases officers either failed to provide information, or gave an unlawful reason.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) — Chicago police stop-and-frisk practices disproportionately target African-American residents, with black Chicagoans representing 72 percent of all stops, a report by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has revealed.

    “Black Chicagoans were subjected to 72% of all stops, yet constitute just 32% of the city’s population. And, even in majority white police districts, minorities were stopped disproportionately to the number of minority people living in those districts,” the report, published Monday, reads.

    The study pointed out that police are required to record the reason for stops but in nearly half of the cases officers either failed to provide information, or gave an unlawful reason.

    According to the ACLU, the abuse of stop-and-frisk practice is a violation of individual rights.

    Stop-and-frisk is a practice of stopping a person on suspicion of criminal wrongdoing. The suspect is often subject to questioning and a search.

    The report comes amid growing discontent over racially discriminatory policing practices in the United States. Late last year, mass protests erupted across the US following non-indictments of two white police officers who shot dead unarmed black men.

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    Tags:
    human rights, discrimination, police, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Chicago, United States
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