16:35 GMT06 March 2021
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    The claim comes ahead of parliamentary elections in May, pending the Scottish National Party remains in power and pushes for a second vote on independence after failing to receive backing from UK prime minister Boris Johnson.

    A Scottish Independence campaigner has lost a bid to seek backing from a top civil court in Edinburgh, Reuters reported on Friday.

    Scotland's Court of Session ruled against campaigner Martin Keatings, who sought legal support for his claim the Scottish parliament could hold a fresh vote on independence from the United Kingdom without approval from Downing Street.

    The Court of Sessions dismissed the case, stating Keatings argument was hypothetical and premature, and did not express a view concerning the legality of the case, Reuters added.

    The news comes amid calls for a second referendum on Scottish independence, namely after Cabinet Secretary for the Constitution, Europe and External Affairs, Michael Russell, said a vote could take place in June after Holyrood unilaterally passes further legislation to approve the process.

    “Best practice suggests that six months should expire between the legislation and the referendum. That is because electoral administrators need time to put in systems — but I do hope the new parliament moves without too much delay to that,” Mr Russell said at the time.

    But PM Johnson has strongly condemned support for a second referendum across Scotland, adding the first in September 2014 had resolved the matter, despite Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon calling for a vote in recent months.

    Scotland voted 55 to 45 in favour of remaining in the UK in the 2014 referendum, which took place ahead of the UK's vote to withdraw from the European Union, backed 62 percent in favour of remaining in the EU by the northernmost British nation.

     

    Tags:
    Boris Johnson, Nicola Sturgeon, court ruling, Brexit, indyref 2.0, Scottish independence, independence, Scotland
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