11:05 GMT07 May 2021
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    Canada’s psychology guru recently returned from a professional hiatus following his battle with akathisia and prescribed-drug dependency. His new book and podcast appearances are being lapped up by his devoted following.

    Jordan Peterson has shared his thoughts on the “destructive” price of success while appearing on the "Modern Wisdom Podcast" alongside host Chris Williamson.

    The Canadian professor agreed with Williamson that people generally don’t understand the success-related suffering celebrities like legendary golfer Tiger Woods and tech maverick Elon Musk endure. Peterson says that not everyone is suited to becoming a “power-mad c-suite” and workaholic – so envying the super successful is worthless. 

    “It’s a temperamental issue to a large degree. You know many of those people are hyper conscientious and so they’ll work whatever you put them what they would do is work. That’s who they are and it’s biological as well.

    According to Peterson, conscientiousness in general is “a good predictor of long-term success” but it can also prove destructive for people who buckle under the strain off taking on too much responsibility.

    “So there is a price to be paid for conscientiousness – it opens you up to a certain set of vulnerabilities,” the psychologist concluded.

    During the talk, Peterson also discussed with Williamson his “shock” at finding out that he'd been parodied into the image of Captain America’s Nazi-styled archenemy Red Skull in a new Marvel Comics issue. He's since tried to turn the situation into something “playful,” by creating memes and Red Skull-themed t-shirts to raise money for charity.

    “I’ve been playing with that ever since, I suppose, on Twitter. People are producing memes now of Red Skull or superimposed upon the picture of him things I’ve actually said instead of the hypothetical things that the people who don’t like me wish I said and then purposefully misinterpret [sic],” he explained.

    The professor recently released his new “Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life” book shortly after returning to public life following a struggle with health issues associated with benzodiazepine addiction. Peterson rose to public prominence back in 2016 with YouTube videos criticising Canadian lawmakers for introducing “compelled” speech laws about gender-neutral pronouns. His criticism made him a prominent figure among conservative pundits and people fighting extreme political correctness.

    Tags:
    psychology, Jordan Peterson, Canada
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