16:04 GMT +315 November 2019
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    A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket carrying a communication satellite lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, April 11, 2019

    SpaceX Shows Falcon Heavy Nose Cone Detach Mid-Flight to Be Reused in Upcoming Starlink Launch

    © AP Photo / John Raoux
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    One of the key goals of Elon Musk's SpaceX is to make heavy rockets fully reusable in order to drastically reduce the cost of launches, thereby making commercial ones more economically viable.

    SpaceX’s Twitter account has published rare footage of a Falcon Heavy's nose cone detaching from the rocket in the final stage of flight in order to be reused in the future. The two parts of the cone are seen breaking away as the Arabsat-6A satellite, which was launched in April 2019, bursts forward to assume its place in orbit.

    The nose cone safely landed in the ocean and was later retrieved. According to SpaceX, the cone will be used in the upcoming 11 November launch of a Falcon 9 rocket that will carry 60 Starlink satellites into orbit. SpaceX's founder and CEO, Elon Musk, earlier reported that he had posted his first tweet using a connection provided by the first Starlink satellites. In the future, Musk expects Starlink to provide worldwide internet coverage using the technology.

    Increasing the reusability of its rockets is one of SpaceX's key priorities, since it could significantly reduce the cost of launches. Currently, the company is actively working on increasing the retrieval rate of Falcon 9 boosters using a drone-ship.

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    SpaceX Falcon 9, SpaceX
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