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    This image made available by NASA via Twitter shows the Cygnus spacecraft approaching the International Space Station on Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2015

    Cygnus Cargo Unmanned Module Docks With International Space Station

    © AP Photo / Scott Kelly/NASA
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    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - The Cygnus cargo spacecraft launched earlier this week has successfully completed its docking procedures with the International Space Station (ISS), Northrop Grumman said in a press release.

    "[T]he ‘SS Roger Chaffee’ Cygnus spacecraft successfully completed its rendezvous and berthing maneuvers with the ISS earlier this morning," the release said on Friday. "The mission marks the company’s 11th successful berthing with the orbiting laboratory."

    On Wednesday, Cygnus launched aboard a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport Pad 0A on Wallops Island in the US state of Virginia, the release noted.

    "Once the spacecraft was in close range, crew members on board the space station grappled the spacecraft with the station’s robotic arm at 5:30 a.m. EDT. Cygnus was then guided to its berthing port on… the station’s Unity module and officially installed," the release said.

    READ MORE: US Cargo Spacecraft Cygnus Departs From ISS (VIDEO)

    Cygnus arrived at the ISS with nearly 7,600 pounds (approximately 3,450 kilograms) of cargo, supplies and scientific experiments and will remain docked at the station for three months before departing on secondary missions, Northrop Grumman said.

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    Tags:
    Cygnus, International Space Station (ISS), Northrop Grumman, United States
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