04:39 GMT +313 December 2018
Listen Live
    Mars surface

    LISTEN What Does Mars Wind Sound Like? NASA Reveals Audio Sample From Red Planet

    © NASA . JPL-Caltech/MSSS
    Tech
    Get short URL
    5159

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – The US space agency NASA’s Mars lander InSight has sent back the first ever recording of sounds of winds blowing on the Red Planet, NASA has said.

    "NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander, which touched down on Mars just 10 days ago, has provided the first ever ‘sounds’ of Martian winds on the Red Planet," NASA said in a statement.

    The space agency characterized the sounds of the Martian winds as "haunting low rumble caused by vibrations from the wind, estimated to be blowing between 10 to 15 mph (5 to 7 meters a second)."

    The vibrations caused by the winds were recorded by a seismometer, installed on the InSight lander, on December 1 as the winds were blowing across its solar panels from northwest to southeast, according to NASA.

    The space agency also published a video containing the recording of the sounds which represent a very low pitched noise which is best heard with headphones and subwoofers. The wind vibrations were also recorded by the lander’s air pressure sensor.

    NASA said that the mission engineers planned to move the seismometer from the lander on to the ground next to it. The equipment will gather vibrations from deep within the Red Planet.

    WATCH Real ‘Death Star’ of Star Wars Appear Near Mars

    On November 26, InSight made a historic landing on Mars and began sending images back to mission controllers.

    Related:

    NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Mysterious Shiny Object on Mars (PHOTO)
    NASA Lands on Mars as GM Closes Plants in North America
    Touchdown: NASA's InSight Lands on Mars (VIDEO, PHOTO)
    Elon Musk Believes There’s a 70% Chance of Him Getting to Mars
    Tags:
    seismometer, sound, wind, NASA, Mars
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik