11:02 GMT +315 November 2018
Listen Live
    New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system.

    ‘Celestial Artwork': ESO Releases New Image of Star Cluster RCW 38 (PHOTOS)

    © Courtesy of European Southern Observatory
    Tech
    Get short URL
    280

    The European Southern Observatory released an image Wednesday of star cluster RCW 38 that offers a view of hundreds of young, hot, massive stars.

    The image was captured by the HAWK-I infrared imager that's mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, ESO revealed in a news release.

    New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system.
    New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system.

    "The central area of RCW 38 is visible here as a bright, blue-tinted region, an area inhabited by numerous very young stars and protostars that are still in the process of forming," the release states. "The intense radiation pouring out from these newly born stars causes the surrounding gas to glow brightly."

    "This is in stark contrast to the streams of cooler cosmic dust winding through the region, which glow gently in dark shades of red and orange. The contrast creates this spectacular scene — a piece of celestial artwork," the announcement adds.

    The image last obtained of RCW 38 was taken in 2009 with the Wide Field Imager instrument with data collected through four different filters on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope in La Sille, Chile, according to the observatory.

    The dense star cluster RCW 38 glistens about 5,500 light years away in the direction of the constellation Vela (the Sails). RCW 38 is an embedded cluster, in that the nascent cloud of dust and gas still envelops its stars.
    The dense star cluster RCW 38 glistens about 5,500 light years away in the direction of the constellation Vela (the Sails). RCW 38 is an "embedded" cluster, in that the nascent cloud of dust and gas still envelops its stars.

    The stark differences in images are due to the researchers' decision to take the 2018 image with an infrared imager instead of in optical wavelengths, as officials had done in 2009.

    "Optical images appear emptier of stars due to dust and gas blocking our view of the cluster," researchers explained. "Observations in the infrared, however, allow us to peer through the dust that obscures the view in the optical and delve into the heart of this star cluster."

    The image was taken as part of a series of test observations for the HAWK I and GRAAL, an adaptive optics module that aids HAWK I in capturing images.

    Related:

    Progress MS-09 Space Freighter Sets Record Reaching ISS in Less Than Four Hours
    Russia, China Consider Joint Space Station – Source
    Space Plumbers to the Rescue! US Asks Russia to Fix Its Broken Toilet on ISS
    Impact Event: Tunguska Meteorite and Other Space Objects that Have Struck Earth
    China Rising as Major Space Power
    Tags:
    RCW 38, Star Cluster, space, European Southern Observatory
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik