03:44 GMT +320 August 2019
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    President Vladimir Putin takes part in gala match of Night Hockey League's 6th National Festival

    Putin Plays Hockey With Belarus President Despite Injury

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    On Thursday, Russian President Vladimir Putin received a minor injury in Sochi, Russia, when he joined the state national judo team for training and had a sparring session with gold medalist Beslan Mudranov.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin is participating in a hockey game, stepping onto an ice rink in Sochi accompanied by Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko and his son, Nikolai.

    The heads of states are playing on the same team with professional Russian and Belarus hockey players.

    The game comes after earlier in the day, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov reacted to reports that the 2016 Olympic judo champion had injured the president's finger saying that Putin feels well and the incident wouldn't ruin his plans to play hockey. 

    "[Putin] feels good. He feels excellent and is going to meet President [of Belarus Alexander] Lukashenko and after that to play hockey… During one of the holds [Putin] hurt a finger… That is a routine trauma. There is nothing terrible here. Just sports", Peskov told reporters.

    READ MORE: Putin Gets Injury During Judo Sparring With Russian Olympic Champ (VIDEO)

    The training that left the president slightly injured came after Putin had taken part in trilateral talks on Syria with his Iranian and Turkish counterparts.

    Putin is a judo master of sports and holds regular sparrings with various opponents.

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    Tags:
    judo, injuries, hockey, Vladimir Putin, Alexander Lukashenko, Russia
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