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    One of the shops at the More Shipyards in Feodosia. The shipyards will have contracts on building naval ships after being modernized with the first stage of modernization scheduled for fall 2016

    Deputy PM: Russia Pulls Crimean Defense Enterprises Out of Crisis Over Two Years

    © Sputnik/ Sergey Mamontov
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    The Russian authorities managed to pull Crimean defense enterprises out of the crisis within last two years, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin said on Friday.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) – Rogozin stated that almost all Crimean defense enterprises have contracts and good prospects now.

    "Within a couple of years we managed to pull them out of the crisis," Rogozin said.

    Earlier on Friday, Russian Deputy Defense Minister Yuriy Borisov said that the Crimean enterprises’ state defense procurement exceeded 10 billion rubles [over $172 million].

    Crimea rejoined Russia in early 2014 after the referendum held on March 16, with almost 97 percent of the residents having voted for the reunification. The decision to hold the plebiscite was made after a coup d'etat in Ukraine. Kiev still considers Crimea an occupied territory.

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    Tags:
    crisis, defense, Dmitry Rogozin, Crimea, Russia
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    • avatar
      michael
      left to the kievans and western ukraine the concerns would be long gone and the sites barren. It just goes to show what can be done constructively.
    • avatar
      ivanwa88
      P.S. the former Soviet Union shifted whole sectors of military production capability to Ukraine to support its economy there was a considerable capacity developed over decades which is now almost completely stripped and plundered by the US.
    • avatar
      ivanwa88
      Big part of reason US invaded Ukraine was to degrade military production capacity of Russia to stop mass production of advanced superior analogues and ability to supply other nations which would have bonded those nations in part to Russia. Most of Ukraine's former military production capacity has been stripped by the US with machinery sent all over the place. Had Ukraine stayed loyal to Russia those factories would be in full swing with a economic bonanza for Ukrainian's. Now after US intervention most Ukrainians have starvation at there door sounds much like Yemen and other nations the US invades and pollutes with there toxic waste.
    • R30soarskyesin reply toivanwa88(Show commentHide comment)
      ivanwa88, partially , little partially of that is true , effective ,
      you dont know a thing about ,
      how many heli and Aircraft plants are in Ru ?! uh ,
      how many gas turbine marine engines turbofan turboprop etc are in Ru ?!
      how many various missile and rockets are in Ru , electronics sensors optronics glass ceramics composites metallurgy etc , rocket space and stratfor etc , shipyards ( id say here , not even far from enough , and large ones ) , other
    • avatar
      ivanwa88
      R30 I don't understand your post as it appears you did not understand mine!!? I did not speak of what plants exist in Russia at all obviously there are many that does not detract from the fact that in former Soviet Union times Billions was spent to bring Industry to the Ukraine you are perhaps to young to remember as for me I vividly remember the stream of articles on at times hostile dissent from Russian towns who lost whole Industries shifted to Ukraine to sustain the economy.
      I remember amongst others Khrushchev saying how Russians must sacrifice to support there brother nation.
      Of course as we know Khrushchev was Ukrainian by birth that said I dont know what your point was in your post????
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