21:53 GMT18 September 2020
Listen Live
    Russia
    Get short URL
    22314
    Subscribe

    The head of Russia’s largest bank went undercover as a disabled person in order to discover how efficient his company is in catering to the needs of handicapped people.

    Herman Gref, CEO Russia's Sberbank, took part in an experiment held in Moscow prior to the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, aimed at determining how well the largest bank in the country caters to the needs of physically handicapped people.

    In order to do so, Gref donned a special GERT aging simulation suit in order to act the part of a handicapped person with a monthly income of 30,000 rubles (about $467) who came to a Sberbank branch office in order to get a 100,000 rubles loan (about $1,556) to purchase a wheelchair.

    • Herman Gref, president and Chairman of Executive Board at Sberbank of Russia, during the launch of a project to adapt the bank's services and products to physically challenged people
      Herman Gref, president and Chairman of Executive Board at Sberbank of Russia, during the launch of a project to adapt the bank's services and products to physically challenged people
      © Sputnik / Kirill Kallinikov
    • Herman Gref, president and Chairman of Executive Board at Sberbank of Russia, during the launch of a project to adapt the bank's services and products to physically challenged people
      Herman Gref, president and Chairman of Executive Board at Sberbank of Russia, during the launch of a project to adapt the bank's services and products to physically challenged people
      © Sputnik / Kirill Kallinikov
    1 / 2
    © Sputnik / Kirill Kallinikov
    Herman Gref, president and Chairman of Executive Board at Sberbank of Russia, during the launch of a project to adapt the bank's services and products to physically challenged people

    After completing the procedure, Gref took off the suit and advised the employee who serviced him to try it on; he further explained that he was barely able to see the figures that the bank employee was showing him on the monitor, and was barely able to hear his explanations.

    All in all, Gref surmised, there’s still room for improvement, according to RIA Novosti.

    "I believe that all employees who work with handicapped persons should spend some time wearing such a suit in order to understand what it feels like. Experience like this helps develop empathy," he said.

    Gref added that Sberbank has a branch called Special Bank dedicated to developing and adapting the bank’s products and services for handicapped people.

    "We have about 12 million handicapped people in the country, not to mention about 40 million people with limited mobility. And according to experts, most of them are Sberbank clients. Over recent years we’ve made considerable strides in adapting our branch offices in order to better accommodate the needs of handicapped persons," he explained.

    A similar experiment is also expected to be conducted in Sberbank offices in St. Petersburg.

    Related:

    Sberbank to Reach Record Net Profit Margin by End of 2016 - CEO
    Sberbank Takes Responsibility For Players’ Injuries During Pokemon GO Game
    Russia's Sberbank CEO Predicts Cash Gradually Falling Out of Use
    Tags:
    experiment, service, suit, disability, Sberbank, Moscow, Russia
    Community standardsDiscussion