02:29 GMT30 May 2020
Listen Live
    Russia
    Get short URL
    0 152
    Subscribe

    Russian President Vladimir Putin said that launches of the super-heavy version of rockets from Vostochny space center should be considered.

    NOVO-OGARYOVO (Moscow Region) (Sputnik) – Russian space experts should study the possibility of launching super-heavy rockets from the Vostochny space center currently under construction in Russia's Far East, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Monday.

    The space center's launch facilities include those needed the heavy version of the Angara rocket, but "launches of the super-heavy [version] should also be considered," Putin told Igor Komarov, the head of Russia's space agency Roscosmos.

    "You should think about this," Putin told Komarov.

    The space chief replied, in his turn, that the space agency is working on the super-heavy version of the Angara, needed for a manned mission to the moon.

    Komarov said the agency's scientists have designed a scheme allowing to cut planned design expenditures for a super-heavy rocket tenfold, from 600 billion rubles ($11.5 billion) to 60 billion rubles ($1.15 billion).

    In September 2014, the Russian President approved development of super-heavy rockets with a cargo capacity of up to 150 metric tons.

    Super-heavy rockets are needed to send spacecraft beyond Earth's orbit, specifically for Russia's ambitious moon exploration program, to be carried out as part of the Russian Federal Space Program for 2016-2025.

    In mid-March Roscosmos announced that Russia's Angara-5 carrier rocket could be modified for use in future Moon missions.

    Related:

    First Launch From Vostochny Space Center Slated for December 2015
    Russia’s Vostochny Cosmodrome Construction Reaches Home Stretch
    Vostochny Space Center Construction Back On Track for 2015: Rogozin
    Chief of Russia’s Vostochny Space Center Project Resigns
    Tags:
    Vostochny space center, Igor Komarov, Vladimir Putin, Russia
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via SputnikComment via Facebook