02:40 GMT28 January 2020
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    McDonald's has filed a lawsuit with the arbitration court in the Russian city of Voronezh asking it to rule the decisions and actions of the local department of the country's consumer watchdog Rospotrebnadzor illegal.

    Voronezh, September 24 (RIA Novosti) - McDonald's has filed a lawsuit with the arbitration court in the Russian city of Voronezh asking it to rule the decisions and actions of the local department of the country's consumer watchdog Rospotrebnadzor illegal.

    "The arbitration court has received a lawsuit by McDonald's against Voronezh region's Federal Service on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being," a spokesperson for the court told RIA Novosti.

    According to court documents, the company requests that the decisions and actions of Rospotrebnadzor be ruled illegal.

    The hearing is scheduled to take place on October 21.

    Earlier, Rospotrebnadzor found violations in two of the city's McDonald's restaurants during an audit and filed a suit to bring the company to administrative liability under the article of "violations of technical regulations requirements by the manufacturer, executor and seller".

    The penalty for the article is a fine in the amount of 300,000 rubles ($ 7,700) to be imposed on the corporate entity.

    Mass audits into McDonald's have been going on in Russia since August. About 10 restaurants have already been shut down, with the company having constantly stated it would appeal the decisions.

    McDonald's, which is one of the biggest fast food restaurant chains in the world, has 444 restaurants in 75 regions of Russia.

    Russia's Deputy Prime Minister Olga Golodets stated that Rospotrebnadzor did not intend to conduct a total check in all the restaurants of the fast food chain in Russia. According to her, checks are proceeding according to plan.

    Tags:
    lawsuit, Rospotrebnadzor, McDonald’s
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