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    Chechnya's Kadyrov condemns blasts in Moscow subway

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    Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov condemned terrorist attacks that killed at least 37 people and injured at least another 65 in the Moscow subway early on Monday morning.

    Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov condemned terrorist attacks that killed at least 37 people and injured at least another 65 in the Moscow subway early on Monday morning.

    Two blasts in Moscow's subway stations Lubyanka and Park Kultury occurred during the early morning rush hour with an interval of 40 minutes, the first one at approximately 8:00 a.m.

    The head of the country's Federal Security Service (FSB), Alexander Bortnikov, said terrorists from Russia's volatile North Caucasus may have been responsible for the blasts. Bortnikov said the bodies of "two female suicide bombers who were residing in the North Caucasus had been found at the explosion sites."

    "Terror attacks were staged in Moscow. People died and were injured. Again terrorism bids defiance to the state, [to the] society. The organizers and executors, whoever they are, are trying to spark chaos, drive Russia into the abyss of fear, distrust, undermine its economy. There should be no indifferent people in the fight against this evil. Evil does not choose its victims on the basis of national, religious, or racial traits," the Chechen president said.

    He said thousands of people died in terror attacks in Chechnya, including the first Chechen president, Akhmad Kadyrov, who was killed by a bomb explosion in a stadium in Chechnya's capital, Grozny, during a WWII victory parade on May 9, 2004.

    "During this difficult day for Russia's peoples, we declare with all responsibility that [we] will fight against terrorists until they are completely destroyed. It is impossible to eradicate evil just by persuasion," he said, adding those guilty of the attacks "should be found and punished."

    Russia has been fighting militants in the North Caucasus for over a decade, including two brutal separatist wars in Chechnya. Analysts suggest Monday's attacks are revenge for a recent operation in Chechnya that saw the deaths of over 20 radical Islamic fighters.

    Aside from Chechnya, violence is also a regular occurrence in the neighboring republics of Ingushetia and Dagestan.

    Ingush President Yunus-Bek Yevkurov sent on Monday a telegram to Moscow Mayor Yury Luzhkov, in which he expressed his condolences to the families of the victims and those affected by the attacks and said he was ready to provide all necessary help and support to the Moscow authorities to minimize the damage caused by the blasts.

    GROZNY, March 29 (RIA Novosti)

     

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