23:29 GMT +320 May 2019
Listen Live
    Russia

    Russia ready to help normalize situation in Lebanon - Putin

    Russia
    Get short URL
    0 10

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said on Friday that Russia was ready to provide economic and political assistance to help Lebanon overcome long-running factional violence.

    MOSCOW, November 7 (RIA Novosti) - Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said on Friday that Russia was ready to provide economic and political assistance to help Lebanon overcome long-running factional violence.

    "We are ready to do all we can, both in the economic sphere and through political contacts, so that the situation [in Lebanon] normalizes," Putin said after talks with Lebanon's parliamentary majority leader, Saad Hariri, who arrived in Moscow on Friday.

    The leaders of the pro-Syrian opposition and the ruling majority signed a power-sharing deal in Doha, settling the immediate crisis in Lebanon. The agreement paved the way for a new president to be elected and the opposition to gain veto power in a new national unity government.

    However, sporadic fighting between rival factions in Lebanon continues despite the peace agreement.

    Last month, Lebanon and Syria formally established diplomatic ties for the first time in their modern history. Lebanon became an independent state in 1943, two years before Syria.

    "We want Russia to continue its constructive role and help Lebanon in correcting its relations with its neighbors, particularly Syria in light of the recent establishment of diplomatic relations between Beirut and Damascus," Hariri said.

    He also said that Lebanon was counting on Russia to help achieve an Israeli withdrawal from the disputed Shebaa Farms, an Israeli-occupied area on the border between Lebanon and the Golan Heights, which Israel captured from Syria in the 1967 Six Day War.

    Following the assassination of Lebanon's former prime minister, Rafik Hariri, in 2005, Syria gave in to international pressure and pulled its troops out of Lebanon, after having a military presence in the neighboring state for almost three decades.

    In addition to Hariri's death, anti-Syrian factions in Lebanon have blamed Damascus for a series of attacks since 2005 targeting lawmakers and politicians opposed to Syria. Syria has denied the allegations.

    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik