19:33 GMT18 February 2020
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    'End' of Private For-Profit Federal Prison System; GOP 'Civil War' vs. Reality

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    Shockingly good news on today's BradCast, following today's remarkable announcement by the U.S. Dept. of Justice that they are working to end the federal government's "use of privately operated prisons". After that, you may want to pop up some popcorn to best enjoy the rest of today's program.

    First up today, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates issued a memo, as Washington Post reported, instructing federal officials "to either decline to renew the contracts for private prison operators when they expire or 'substantially reduce' the contract's scope. The goal, Yates wrote, is 'reducing — and ultimately ending — our use of privately operated prisons.'

    Wow. Her memo goes on to cite a recent DoJ Inspector General's report finding that privately run prisons do not provide same level of service, "do not save substantially on costs" and "do not maintain the same level of safety and security" as those run by the federal government's Bureau of Prisons.

    I am joined by Carl Takei, staff attorney for the ACLU's National Prison Project, for both an explanation and a bit of a victory lap after his organization and others have spent decades taking on the private, for-profit prison industry. Takei details what the announcement means, why it has finally come about now, and how the ACLU and others — including investigative reporters, the Bernie Sanders campaign, and eventually the Hillary Clinton campaign — have long argued precisely what the DoJ has admitted today.

    "Handing control of prisons over to for-profit companies is a recipe for abuse, neglect, and misconduct because their primary duty is to their shareholders. They have to deliver value to their shareholders by skimming a profit off of whatever payments the government gives them to run the system," Takei tells me.

    "In the 1990s, when the Bureau of Prisons first started this experiment with private prisons, the argument was they could provide incarceration more cheaply and that the innovations of the free market would somehow make things better. In fact, it turned out to be far worse. Because the major way that you can make money off incarceration is by cutting expenses," he says. "Some of the biggest expenses are security staff, medical staff, and providing medical services. Anywhere that the company starts cutting back its expenditures, it ends up harming the people inside."

    He goes on to offer some startling examples of both that and of some of the easily-disproven responses and claims of the for-profit, private prison industry lobby. Next, we look at how the coming and/or current GOP Civil War is shaping up not as a battle of ideas for the party's future, but as a wingnut street-fight over whose false version of 'reality' will win out. It's getting quite ugly. But also, at least for those of us on the outside, kinda hilarious in several regards. Then, Desi Doyen joins us for the latest Green News Report, with "some news that blows" and, finally, we close with the NYC Parks Department hilariously short response to the growing erection of naked Donald Trump statues around the city. You're welcome.

    You can find Brad's previous editions here.

    And tune in to Radio Sputnik one hour a day, five days a week.

    Tags:
    Bush legacy, private prisons, Oil, Lobbyists, US elections, injustice, 2016 Election, 2016 US Presidential Run, Department of Justice, GOP, Republicans, ACLU, Democrats, RNC, CNN, Fox News, Sally Yates, Andrew Breitbart, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, United States
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