11:12 GMT05 July 2020
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    Fault Lines
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    On this episode of Fault Lines, hosts Garland Nixon & Lee Stranahan were joined by guests to talk about the prospect of a second wave, the United States' economic situation and the unseen depths of its unemployment iceberg, and to argue about the Black Lives Matter protests some more.

    Guests:

    Netra Halperin - Producer and Director of foreign policy documentary films at Peace Films | PTSD From COVID, Police Violence

    Mark Frost - Economist, professor, consultant, drummer, eagle scout, marine, libertarian’ish | Unemployment and Market Realism\

    Maram Susli - Political Commentator and Geopolitical Analyst | The BLM Movements and America's Foreign Policy

    Kim Iversen - Independent Journalist and Host of the Kim Iversen Show on YouTube | COVID-19 Lethality and Asymptomatic Spread

    In our first hour, we were joined by guests to talk about PTSD, depression, and the other anxious comorbidities of the commingled, morbid crises we're facing. Afterword we spoke with Mark Frost about his cymbals, the real unemployment numbers, and the long wake of economic problems we'll only fully recognize in coming months.

    In our second hour, we were joined by Maram Susli to compare America's rhetoric on Black Lives Matter with its imperialist legacy around the world, and to look at the course of the ongoing unrest in the United States and to speculate on where it'll head next.

    In our third hour, we were joined by Kim Iversen to talk about COVID-19 in the United States, whether the claims of a second wave are driven by a surge in cases or merely more testing capacity, and to try to help mediate disagreements in the conversation about the George Floyd protests and police brutality.

    We'd love to get your feedback at radio@sputniknews.com

    Tags:
    economics, Unemployment, United States, COVID-19, Black Lives Matter, George Floyd
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