10:42 GMT +317 October 2019
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    Russia or Daesh? Seems Like Washington Made Its Choice

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    Russian officials have long urged the Obama administration to join forces to tackle international terrorism, but Washington appears to have ruled out broad anti-Daesh cooperation between the two in Syria, analyst Vladimir Filippov asserted, adding that the White House will not change its stance regardless of who wins the US presidential election.

    "Some say that if Donald Trump wins, it will be better. It clearly won't," the expert wrote for RIA Novosti. "It's not because Trump is lying when he says that he wants to promote constructive dialogue with Russia. His entourage will not let him."

    Filippov was not referring to Trump's aides or other members of his team, but rather hawks among US lawmakers, senior military commanders, like NATO's former Supreme Allied Commander Gen. Philip M. Breedlove and the military-industrial complex.

    Indeed, several high-ranking military officials in the US have placed Russia as a top threat for Washington and its allies. For Filippov, this is a clear indication that Moscow is targeted because it stands in the way of America's global dominance.

    This is not to say that Russia and the US are not working together to bring lasting peace to Syria, but this cooperation has been limited. Moscow and Washington played a major role in kick starting the UN-backed peace process in the fall of 2015. Both countries brokered a nationwide ceasefire that has largely held since February.

    "The ceasefire has been observed in most provinces of the Syrian Arab Republic," the Russian Centre for reconciliation of opposing sides in the Syrian Arab Republic confirmed in its latest report released on Monday.

    Last week, Brett McGurk, US President Barack Obama's special envoy for the anti-Daesh coalition, said that Russia would not be invited to join the US-led counterterrorism coalition, because Washington "does not trust" Moscow.

    However, earlier this month, Russian President Vladimir Putin and his US counterpart reaffirmed their readiness to step up coordination of American and Russian military activities in Syria.

    In addition, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and US State Secretary John Kerry reached a deal aimed at enhancing the fragile ceasefire regime in Syria. They also agreed to work together on tackling al-Nusra Front, al-Qaeda's offshoot in the war-torn Arab country, although the details of this agreement have not been made public.

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    Tags:
    Syrian ceasefire, anti-Daesh coalition, Russian aerial campaign, Syrian conflict, counterterrorism, Daesh, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Barack Obama, Syria, United States, Russia
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