15:14 GMT +320 July 2019
Listen Live
    Ministerial meeting of Russia, the USA, Saudi Arabia and Turkey on Syria in Vienna. From left: Turkey's Foreign Minister Feridun Hadi Sinirlioglu, US Secretary of State John Kerry, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia Adel al-Jubeir, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov

    Obama’s Policy in Syria Drives US Allies in Middle East to Russia

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
    Politics
    Get short URL
    2194

    While the US is trying to turn the world to its approach toward the Syrian conflict its traditional allies in the Middle East are reaching out to Russia, which has emerged as a decisive player in the region.

    Washington’s traditional Middle East allies have run out of patience with President Barack Obama’s policy in Syria, and they are now turning to "a resurgent Russia", US journalists Josh Rogin and Eli Lake wrote in their article.

    Some in Washington consider the new ties a threat to US dominance in the Middle East. But the Obama administration sees this as an opportunity to engage with Moscow to normalize the situation in the Middle East, the article read.

    Last Friday, US State Secretary John Kerry convened a meeting in Vienna between the foreign ministers of Russia, Turkey and Saudi Arabia. During the talks, Kerry expressed hope that the four countries could work together to settle the Syrian crisis.

    "But while Kerry focused on convincing Russia to join with the West, Putin has been working to convince America’s Middle East allies that Moscow is the new power in the region," according to the article.

    Prince Turki al-Faisal, Saudi Arabia’s former ambassador to the US and former intelligence chief, said Russian President Vladimir Putin has outmaneuvered the US in Syria and Russia’s position demands attention and respect.

    Last week, Russia also struck an agreement with Jordan to coordinate military actions against the Islamic State (ISIL) militant group in Syria.

    Other gulf states have sent their diplomats to Moscow in the last two weeks to discuss the Russian military operation in Syria, the authors underscored.

    American allies who are not active in multilateral diplomacy over Syria have also been developing closer ties with Moscow, the authors underscored in the article for Bloomberg View.

    This month, after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met with Putin, Israel established a hotline with the Russian Defense Ministry to avoid an accidental confrontation between their forces. After Egyptian President Abdel el-Sisi visited Putin in August he pledged Egypt would cooperate with Moscow against ISIL.

    Related:

    US Indecisiveness Driving Mid East Allies to Side With Russia in Syria
    Traditional US Allies in Middle East Building Up Ties With Russia
    Russia, Iran Making Progress in Syria as US Middle East Policy Fails
    Middle East Most Immediate, Severe Test for America's Role in 21st Century
    Tags:
    Middle East, Daesh, military operation, talks, cooperation, United States, Russia
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik