11:17 GMT29 October 2020
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    • Northern lights in the vicinity of the Ura River in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights over the Valley of Glory memorial in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights in the vicinity of the Ura River in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights over the Valley of Glory memorial in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights over the Valley of Glory memorial in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights over the Valley of Glory memorial in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights in the vicinity of the Ura River in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights in the vicinity of the Ura River in the Murmansk region.
    • Northern lights over the Valley of Glory memorial in the Murmansk region.
    © Sputnik / Pavel Lvov
    Northern lights in the vicinity of the Ura River in the Murmansk region.

    An aurora, sometimes referred to as polar lights (aurora polaris), northern lights, is the glow of the upper atmosphere that occurs as a result of their interaction with charged particles of the solar wind.

    Depending on the altitude and composition of the atmosphere, the glow can be of different colors and shapes. For example, if the solar wind collides with nitrogen, and as a result, it loses molecules, we will see a violet and blue glow, and if there is no loss of molecules, we will see all shades of red. The most common greenish glow is when oxygen molecules collide with the solar wind.

    Russia's Murmansk region ranks among the best places on the planet for observing the northern lights along with Northern Ireland, Norway and Finland. 

    It is not difficult to find the Murmansk region on the map, it is the northernmost region of the European part of Russia located on the Kola Peninsula, most of which is located beyond the Arctic Circle.

    Tags:
    Russia, Murmansk Region, Murmansk
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