05:10 GMT +321 October 2019
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    A US Army's Patriot Surface-to Air missile system is displayed during the Air Power Day at the US airbase in Osan, south of Seoul on October 12, 2008

    US Army Orders New Net Centric Radar for Patriot Interceptors

    © AFP 2019 / KIM JAE-HWAN
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    LTAMDS will expand the Patriot PAC-3 Missile’s battle space range of operations and it will act as a sensor node.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Northrop Grumman Corporation said in a news release that the US Army has ordered a new net centric radar to perform risk reduction and associated mission capabilities intended to replace 50-year-old Patriot interceptor missile radars.

    "LTAMDS [Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor] will be the… first net centric radar to be added to the Army’s Integrated Air and Missile Defense enterprise controlled by the Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System (IBCS)," the release said on Friday.

    Northrop Grumman received a contract from the US Army to perform risk reduction for radar technology and associated mission capabilities intended to replace the Army’s aging Patriot radars, the release explained.

    "IBCS is the advanced command and control system that integrates air and missile defense sensors and weapons, including Patriot, to generate a real-time comprehensive threat picture and enable any-sensor, best-shooter operations," Northrop Grumman said.

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    Tags:
    risk reduction, new technology, army, radar, missile, military, contract, LTAMDS, Patriot, IBCS, Northrop Grumman, US Department of Defense (DoD), United States
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