19:35 GMT +323 October 2019
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    US soldiers stand in the shade of the wing of a Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey, a US multi-mission, tiltrotor military aircraft, displayed at the Dubai Airshow on November 8, 2015

    US Navy Pays $57Mln for Single Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey Tilt Rotor

    © AFP 2019 / MARWAN NAAMANI
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    The Department of Defense said that the US Navy has awarded Bell-Boeing a more than $57 million contract to retrofit of one MV-22 in support of the aircraft’s readiness and modernization program.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — The US Navy has awarded Bell-Boeing a more than $57 million contract to retrofit of one MV-22 in support of the aircraft’s readiness and modernization program, the Department of Defense said in a press release.

    "Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office [in] Amarillo, Texas is being awarded [a] $57,107,283… contract for… the retrofit of one MV-22 aircraft in support of the V-22 Common Configuration-Readiness and Modernization (CC-RAM) Program," the release stated on Thursday.

    The MV-22 Block C upgrade incorporates weather radar, an improved environmental control system, troop commander situational awareness display, upgraded standby flight instrument and GPS repeater and additional chaff/flare equipment, according to published reports.

    In mid-April, the US Navy ordered another $38.8 million worth of repairs on different parts of the controversial V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. However, the V-22 has had at least seven hull-loss accidents resulting in at least 36 fatalities.

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    Tags:
    MV-22 Osprey, The US Navy, United States
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