09:16 GMT +314 November 2019
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    Anti-government protests set fire while security forces fired live ammunition and tear gas near the state-run TV in Baghdad

    Online Access Cut in Baghdad, Much of Iraq - Report

    © AP Photo / Hadi Mizban
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    Iraq has been hit by nationwide protests since early October, with citizens reportedly demanding the ouster of the government, as well as economic reforms, better living conditions, social welfare and an end to corruption.

    As rallies grew violent, authorities claims that they must declare a curfew and cut internet access in Baghdad and five other regions.

    According to data from the NetBlocks internet observatory, online "access has been cut across much of Iraq by internet providers as of 21:00 UTC, Monday 4 November 2019 (00:00 Baghdad time 5 November 2019)".

    Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi promised earlier in a televised address to carry out a cabinet reshuffle and introduce changes to election laws.

    At the same time, Mahdi warned that the government's resignation would throw the country into further chaos. Authorities have previously conducted a reshuffle in security bodies in provinces where protests initially broke out.

    Dozens of protesters were injured as a result of violent clashes with security forces in Baghdad near the area where Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi's office is located, witnesses said on Monday.

    On Monday, a general strike was declared in a majority of Iraqi cities, while main highways remain blocked.

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    Tags:
    Violence, access, internet, protests, Baghdad, Iraq
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