02:10 GMT +312 November 2019
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    دختران نینجا در افغانستان

    Teenage Afghan NINJA GIRLS Bring Japanese Martial Arts to Kabul (VIDEO)

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    17-year-old Fatima Sultani and 19-year-old Fereshta Ahmadi started practising jiu-jitsu and ninjutsu only a few years ago. They are the country’s first and only “ninjas”; they practice the ancient Japanese martial arts in Kabul.

    Despite difficult conditions throughout the country and persisting security problems, as well as a lack of relevant programmes and sporting facilities, two girls from restive Afghanistan have managed to master Japanese martial arts.

    "Ninja" literally translates as "hiding". Japanese spies who participated in various kinds of secret missions, such as espionage, fraud, sabotage, contract killings and samurai fights, where they displayed a mastery of disguise and ninjutsu, were called ninjas.

    READ MORE: Ninja Takeover: Real Shadow Warriors to Appear Before Japanese Parliament

    In addition to exercises, this martial art includes using different types of weapons, such as swords, spears, bows and arrows.

    Dressed in special black Ninja costumes, Fatima and Fereshta hone their movements and improve their self-defence skills. Fatima started practising jiu-jitsu and ninjutsu two years ago after seeing some films about ninjas.

    "For two years we have been promoting these martial arts in Afghanistan. I became interested in Japanese martial arts after watching films about ninjas. The main difference between this sport and any other sports is freedom and the fact that it's not limited to any place; we can show it everywhere."

    According to Fereshta, there are only two ninjas in Afghanistan today, herself and Fatima. She believes that the situation in the country is not conducive to the promotion of sports among women, and that today girls cannot freely engage in sports. "Although Fatima and I practice ninjutsu in Afghanistan, in general the conditions in the country do not at all mean that women are free to do sports."

    Fatima and Fereshta practice six days per week in the Fajr complex at hours scheduled specifically for women. They hope to be able to take part in competitions outside of Afghanistan.

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    Tags:
    ninja, martial arts, jiu-jitsu, Afghanistan
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