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    An image grab taken on April 16, 2014 from a video released on March 29, 2014 by Al-Malahem Media, the media arm of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), allegedly shows AQAP jihadists listening to their chief Nasser al-Wuhayshi at an undisclosed location in Yemen

    Pentagon Conducts Additional Strikes in Yemen on 11 al-Qaeda Members

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    The US military conducted additional strikes in Yemen targeting members of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) terror group, US Department of Defense spokesperson Capt. Jeff Davis said in a briefing on Monday.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Last week, US Air Force's strikes killed six al-Qaeda terrorists in Yemen.

    "We conducted a strike on April 18… that was against three AQAP terrorists, and an additional strike yesterday, April 23… that strike was against eight AQAP terrorists," Davis told reporters.

    "Since February 28, we conducted more than 80 precision strikes against AQAP militants, infrastructure, fighting positions and equipment in Yemen."

    On January 29, President Donald Trump’s administration ordered its first military raid against the al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) terror group in Yemen, which is banned in Russia. It resulted in the death of Navy SEAL Ryan Owens.

    During the operation, US special operations forces killed 14 militants as well as civilians, including the eight-year-old daughter of previously assassinated al-Qaeda leader Anwar Awlaki. They US military also experienced an aircraft crash-landing. According to media reports, the operation's goal was to capture or kill the group's leader Qassim Rimi, who is considered the third most dangerous terrorist in the world and a master recruiter. However, he survived.

    The AQAP was established in 2009 and has been condemned as a terrorist organization by the United States, Russia and many other nations.

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