22:23 GMT31 October 2020
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    Battle Against Daesh in Iraq (49)
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    US-led coalition military forces launched nine airstrikes in Syria and 15 airstrikes in Iraq, according to the statement of Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve.

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — US-led coalition forces carried out 24 airstrikes against the Islamic State (ISIL or Daesh) terror group in Syria and Iraq on Thursday, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve said in a press release.

    "In Syria, coalition military forces conducted nine strikes using attack, fight and remotely piloted aircraft against ISIL [Islamic State] targets," the release stated on Friday. "Additionally in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted 15 strikes coordinated with and in support of the Government of Iraq."

    Nine strikes near four Syrian cities, including Mara and Abu Kamal, destroyed oil assets, a tactical vehicle, one fighting position and a facility vehicle-borne-explosive-device facility.

    In Iraq, 15 anti-Daesh airstrikes destroyed targets near six cities, including Mosul and Kisik, the release added. Destroyed were explosives, buildings, supply caches, vehicles, an artillery system, mortars, a weapons factory and a bunker.

    The US-led coalition of more than 60 nations has been conducting anti-Daesh airstrikes in Syria and Iraq since 2014. The strikes in Syria, however, are not authorized by the government of President Bashar Assad or by the United Nations Security Council.

    The Daesh is outlawed in the United States, Russia and other countries.

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    Battle Against Daesh in Iraq (49)

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    airstrikes, Daesh, Iraq, Syria, US
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