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    Lower house members who support the impeachment demonstrate during a session to review the request for Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's impeachment, at the Chamber of Deputies in Brasilia, Brazil, April 15, 2016

    Not a Crook? Brazilian MPs Deeply Divided Over Rousseff's Impeachment Vote

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    With Sunday's impeachment vote on Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff quickly approaching, the country's MPs remain at odds over the matter; Sputnik interviewed several of them to get their take on the fate of the most powerful woman in South America.

    It seems that the Brazilian MPs remain at loggerheads over the Sunday impeachment vote on their country's President Dilma Rousseff, something that was reflected in Sputnik’s interviews with several MPs.

    Deputy Paulo Teixeira of the Workers' Party (of which Rousseff is a member) warned against breaking the law as far as the impeachment is concerned.

    "The impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff will never take place. I am absolutely sure that Brazilian society sees substitution of concepts and attempts to bypass the law that were not uncommon ahead of the impeachment vote. Society demands that parliamentarians should adhere to the rule of law, and we pledge to stick to it," Teixeira told Sputnik. 

    Deputy Caio Narcio, for his part, accused supporters of President Rousseff of making the impeachment vote political.

    Argentine President Cristina Kirchner (2nd-L) and Uruguay's Jose Mujica (L) as Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro (2nd-R) and Brazil's Dilma Rousseff applaud during the Mercosur Summit in Caracas. file photo
    © AFP 2017/ LEO RAMIREZ
    Argentine President Cristina Kirchner (2nd-L) and Uruguay's Jose Mujica (L) as Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro (2nd-R) and Brazil's Dilma Rousseff applaud during the Mercosur Summit in Caracas. file photo

    "In my opinion, the situation in Brazil is very much politicized. Suffice it to mention the government's countless yet unsuccessful appeals to the Supreme Court in an effort to prevent an absolutely legitimate impeachment vote, which is seen by the government as a coup," Narcio said.

    The interviews came after a committee from the lower house (Chamber of Deputies) of Brazil's National Congress approved a report recommending the impeachment of Rousseff. If two-thirds of the lower house vote for the measure, the motion will go to the Senate (upper house).

    Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff gestures during the Education in Defense of Democracy event, at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, on April 12, 2016
    © AFP 2017/ EVARISTO SA
    Rousseff has been facing a wave of public discontent for over a year; Brazil's economy continues to struggle following the major corruption scandal which hit the state-owned petroleum company Petrobras.

    Earlier this week, the Progressive Party (PP) and the Social Democratic Party (PSD) left Rousseff’s coalition. The Brazilian Democratic Movement Party left the governing coalition in late March.

    In March 2015, the first wave of protests against the government of Rousseff brought together at least 500,000 people, becoming the largest political demonstration registered in Brazil since 1984.

    Related:

    Media Pressure Over Rousseff Impeachment 'Could Lead to 'Coup d'Etat'
    Brazil’s Top Court Rejects Request to Suspend Rousseff Impeachment Process
    Impeachment or NSA-Led Coup? Alarming Efforts to Oust Brazil’s Rousseff
    Rousseff Supporters, Opponents Gather in Brasilia Ahead of Impeachment Vote
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    impeachment, attempts, society, law, vote, Dilma Rousseff, Brazil
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