09:26 GMT25 October 2020
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    The death of Bollywood actor Sushant Singh Rajput has been judged suspicious, prompting one of the biggest investigations in the Hindi film industry. The 34-year-old Bollywood star was found dead in his Mumbai flat on 14 June. The actor's death led to a massive uproar, with the case being probed by three major agencies.

    A money laundering probe in Sushant Singh Rajput’s death case has led India's Enforcement Directorate (ED) to filmmaker Dinesh Vijan, who directed the 2017 film Raabta, starring the late actor.

    The ED conducted raids at four locations of director-producer Dinesh Vijan, including his home and office, on Wednesday. The raids were reportedly carried out over payments made to Sushant Singh by Vijan in 2016.

    The director-producer, who has made critically and commercially acclaimed films such as Stree, Hindi Medium, and Luka Chuppi, reportedly signed two projects with the late actor, but the ventures were never substantiated.

    In August, India's Supreme Court handed over the probe to the CBI after Bihar and Mumbai Police clashed over the case’s investigation.

    Recently, Delhi’s AIIMS hospital in its report concluded that it was suicide and not murder after re-evaluating Sushant's autopsy. However, the family rejected the forensic examination report, calling it "faulty".

    Since 14 June, when the "Kai Po Che" film actor was found dead in his apartment, India's federal agencies, including the anti-drug agency, have summoned several top actors, like Deepika Padukone, Sara Ali Khan, Shraddha Kapoor, and Rakul Preet Singh, for questioning.

    Related:

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    Actor Sushant’s Family to Top Probe Agency: Hospital’s Forensic Examination is Faulty
    Actor Sushant's ex-Girlfriend Urges Agency to Stop Meddler Misleading Probe
    Tags:
    suicide, producer, filmmaker, probe, Death, India
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