11:11 GMT15 August 2020
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    New Delhi (Sputnik): There are over 270 species of snakes in India, out of which about 60 are highly venomous. With the onset of the monsoon months, snakes begin to appear in public more and more in India. In a bid to ward off the danger of being bitten by serpents, Hindus worship snakes on “Nag Panchami”.

    This year the festival has fallen in the middle of a pandemic. Several Indian states have declared a total lockdown during the weekends to curb the unnecessary movement of people. So, on Saturday, netizens took to social media to wish each other safe, happy monsoons.

    Wherever wandering snake charmers were spotted with serpents in their sacks, the faithful proceeded with their worship ritual.

    ​Significance of Nag Panchami

    The Hindu calendar is divided into months, and on the fifth day of the first of the monsoon months, the annual “Nag Panchami” festival is observed across India. On this day, snake charmers usually roam the streets in India, letting people offer the serpents milk as peace offerings.

    Also, since Hindu mythology knows snakes as the neck ornament of the God of Destruction – Shiva, devotees flock temples to offer prayers and offerings to the deity during Nag Panchami.

    ​Since snakes are considered deities themselves in India, the country legitimately houses some of the most ancient and beautiful temples dedicated to serpents.

    The Bhujang Nag Temple in Gujarat, Nagaraja Temple and Naganathaswamy Temple in Tamil Nadu, Kukke Subramanya Temple in Karnataka and the Mannarasala Temple in Kerala are five of the most famous centres of snake worship in the country, where snake fairs are usually organised annually to mark the occasion of Nag Panchami. 

    ​Indian Memers Never Take a Break

    Adding a fun spin to the traditions, Twitter is flooded with memes and snarky comments dedicated to fake friends and toxic exes on the occasion of “Nag Panchami”.

    Tags:
    Hinduism, Hindus, national mythology, Snakes, snakes, festive occasion, occasion, festival, India
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