15:01 GMT +313 November 2019
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    Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage gestures on an open topped bus while on the European Election campaign trail in Sunderland, England, Saturday, May 11, 2019

    Brexit Party Leader Farage Chooses Not to Run in UK Election

    © AP Photo / PA / Danny Lawson
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    Earlier this week, British MPs approved Prime Minister Boris Johnson's proposal to hold a snap election on 12 December. Prior to that, the European Union agreed on another Brexit delay until 31 January.

    The leader of Britain's Brexit Party, Nigel Farage, said he would not take part in the 12 December general election.

    "I have thought very hard about this: How do I serve the cause of Brexit best? Do I find a seat and try to get myself into parliament or do I serve the cause better traversing the length and breadth of the United Kingdom supporting 600 candidates, and I've decided the latter course is the right one," he told the BBC's Andrew Marr on Sunday.

    The Brexit Party earlier said that it considers Johnson's deal to be a betrayal of the 2016 referendum. Farage also warned Prime Minister Johnson that his party would use the election campaign to let every home know that his Brexit deal is a "sell out."

    The Conservative Party said that voting for Farage's party could stop Britain's withdrawal from the EU and help the Labour Party leader Corbyn get into Number 10 through "the back door."

    Earlier this week, former UK Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd told the Evening Standard that she was not standing at the upcoming election. She said she spoke to the Prime Minister about the matter and wishes him to succeed. 

    On Tuesday, MPs voted 438 to 20 to support Johnson's proposal to hold an early general election to try and win a majority in parliament and have his Brexit deal with the EU approved. On the same day, the EU granted the UK another Brexit delay until 31 January.

    Tags:
    Amber Rudd, Boris Johnson, Nigel Farage, Brexit Party, Brexit, United Kingdom
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