17:38 GMT +316 October 2019
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    Britain's outgoing Prime Minister, David Cameron with his wife Samantha, waves in front of number 10 Downing Street, on his last day in office as Prime Minister, in central London, Britain July 13, 2016.

    'Posh Boy': David Cameron Mocked by High Street Bookshop’s Comical Window Display

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    Many in the UK still blame the Brexit impasse on David Cameron for his decision to hold the 2016 EU referendum in the first place. Moreover, it appears that, despite his resignation over three years ago, some still haven’t forgiven him.

    The window display of a British high street bookstore, Waterstones, has made an indirect jibe at former Prime Minister David Cameron over his role in leading the country down the Brexit path.

    Mr Cameron’s recently released book, titled ‘For the Record,’ was seen by a Twitter user displayed in the Waterstone’s window amongst a number of other books. However, it appeared that the Waterstones staff had been very particular with the titles that they had chosen to sit Cameron’s book amongst.

    ‘Posh Boys,’ ‘Heroic Failure’ and ‘Why We Get the Wrong Politicians,’ were some of the other hardbacks displayed next to Cameron’s book.

    The Twitter user snapped a photo of the humorous line-up and posted it on Twitter, eventually getting a whopping 1,914 Retweets and 8,338 likes at the time of wiring.

    Some Twitter users subsequently made their views about Mr Cameron’s book clear.

    ​David Cameron was Prime Minister of the UK between 2010 and 2016. It was under his tenure that the now infamous Brexit referendum was held. While Cameron campaigned to Remain, he was adamant throughout much of his political career that the UK should be given a chance to decide on whether to remain party to the European Union. After the result came back with a 51.9% majority to leave the EU, Mr Cameron resigned from No. 10 Downing Street.

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    UK Conservative Party, Brexit, David Cameron
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