20:18 GMT +311 December 2019
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    a British flag is blown by the wind near to Big Ben's clock tower in front of the UK Houses of Parliament in central London

    UK Publishes Updated Temporary Tariff Regime for No-Deal Brexit

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    Despite the fact that the UK is trying to promote UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s proposal for Brexit in the EU, Johnson has repeatedly said that the UK will leave the bloc on 31 October, with or without a deal.

    The UK government has published an update to the country's temporary tariff regime in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

    There are three specific amendments, which affect HGVs, bioethanol and clothing, according to the government website.

    The UK government decided to lower tariffs on HGVs (vehicles with a gross combined mass of over 3,500 kilograms) entering the UK market, adjust tariffs on bioethanol to retain support for UK producers and to apply tariffs to additional clothing products.

    According to the government, 88% of total imports by value would be eligible for tariff-free access.

    Lowered tariffs will last for up to 12 months and be designed to keep prices down for consumers while protecting the fortunes of domestic producers.

    The UK first published a temporary tariff regime in March, before the original deadline to leave the EU.

    Last week, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson revealed a new plan to replace the previously rejected Irish border backstop in a bid to ensure that the United Kingdom leaves the European Union after the October 31 deadline with an agreement. 

    Earlier, Boris Johnson said that he would not request another delay, despite British MPs passing a law last month that requires him to seek another Brexit delay if he fails to secure an agreement by the end of a make-or-break EU summit on October 17-18.

    The Brexit deadline has been extended twice before beyond its original date of 29 March by Johnson's predecessor Theresa May, after her withdrawal agreement was thrice defeated in Parliament, ultimately resulting in her resignation.

    Related:

    EU ‘Might Not Be Inclined’ to Accept Further Brexit Delay - Journalist
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