22:36 GMT +322 October 2019
Listen Live
    A protester wears a British union flag as people gather near parliament during Brexit demonstrations in London, Friday March 29, 2019.

    British Opposition Parties Agree to Act Together to Prevent No-Deal Brexit

    © AP Photo / Alastair Grant
    Europe
    Get short URL
    3810
    Subscribe

    UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has made it clear that he wants the United Kingdom to leave the European Union on 31 October "come what may", although he said he preferred an orderly exit.

    UK opposition parties have issued a joint statement saying that they agreed to prevent a no-deal Brexit.

    "The attendees agreed on the urgency to act together to find practical ways to prevent No Deal, including the possibility of passing legislation and a vote of no-confidence", the statement said.

    The talks were hosted by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, with the participation of the Scottish National Party, the Liberal Democrats, the Green Part,y and the Independent Group for Change.

    Next week, the British Parliament returns from its summer break and is preparing for debates with Prime Minister Boris Johnson who promised to withdraw from the EU with or without the Brexit agreement.

    The United Kingdom was initially supposed to leave the European Union on 29 March, but the UK Parliament’s failure to approve then-Prime Minister Theresa May's deal resulted in the deadline being moved to 31 October.

    One of the main obstacles in EU-UK Brexit talks has been the Irish backstop, a solution that entails keeping Northern Ireland in the EU Customs Union, which is now being abolished by newly appointed Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

    Related:

    Johnson Sets Out Range of Alternatives to Backstop as Farage Calls Brexit Deal 'Worst in History'
    No Breakthrough for Brexit: British PM Threatens to Leave Without Payment
    Boris Johnson Reveals Plan to Flood House of Lords With Brexiteers to Crush Anti-Leave Bias - Report
    Tags:
    withdrawal, Boris Johnson, Brexit, European Union (EU), opposition parties, United Kingdom
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik